Historical Marker

A stone tablet visible to passing motorists, perhaps retreating from Lexington themselves, summarizes the events that transpired during the opening moments of the revolutionary war at Jason Russell's house. May 28, 2014.

A stone tablet visible to passing motorists, perhaps retreating from Lexington themselves, summarizes the events that transpired during the opening moments of the revolutionary war at Jason Russell’s house.
May 28, 2014.

McGurl Square

A plaque at the intersection of Brattle and Summer Streets remembers Lt. Eugene F. McGurl, a navigator in the famous "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo" Doolittle bombing raids. Lt. McGurl was killed in action when his bomber crashed in the Himalayas on February 8, 1942 after a successful raid in Burma. His name can be found in the Manilla American Cemetery and Memorial in the Philippines on the Tablets of the Missing. February 1, 2012.

Once Around

The rotary at Mystic Valley Parkway and Medford Street was featured in the 1991 movie "Once Around" starring Holly Hunter and Richard Dreyfuss. Overhead shots of cars circling the rotary are used in the opening and closing shots of the movie as well as other important times throughout the story.

“He was considered one of the finest men his town had ever produced.”

Lt. John Connors, a Navy SEAL, died on December 20, 1989 during Operation Nifty Package, a mission to disable movement of, then apprehend, Manuel Noriega. Lt. Connor’s platoon succeeded in destroying Noriega’s plane, which facilitated Noriega’s capture on January 3, 1990.

In the October 1990 issue of Reader’s Digest, Malcolm McConnell wrote about Lt. Connor’s heroism in an article titled “Measure of Man.” I hope that you may take the time to read it.

The monument to Lt. John P. Connors at the confluence of Broadway and Warren Street. January 6, 2011.

Arlington Winter

A view of Arlington in the winter from the Alewife Parking Garage on February 2, 2010.

To the top right, one can see the rubble of the Symmes site. At the top middle, the building just barely peeking above the tree line, with the three white dots on top is the Stratton School. In the center, the gabled roof of Arlington Senior Center and the white steeple of the Park Avenue Congregational Church can be seen. At the middle right, three of the four white chimneys and cupola of the Whittemore-Robbins House is visible. And to the left of that, there is the blue-domed steeple of the Highrock Church.

Click here for Arlington Autumn.

WPA Walking Tour – Water Standpipe

To count down the days to the end of summer, I will be taking you on a virtual walking tour of Arlington–the same one outlined in 1937’s The WPA Guide to Massachusetts. Each entry will include an excerpt from the book about each site visited. Hopefully this will give us a little insight as to how things have changed in the past 73 years. This post brings us not only to the last stop on the tour, but the last day of summer 2010.

“The Water Standpipe (open to visitors each second Sun.) rises 50 feet above the loftiest point on Arlington Heights, emphasizing

the great difference between the lowest and highest altitude of this town. From a balcony near the top,

Boston and the harbor are visible to the east; to the west Mt. Monadnock and Mt. Wachusett are dim blue shapes on the horizon.”

The Park Avenue water tower on July 22, 2010.

WPA Walking Tour – Jason Russell House

To count down the days to the end of summer, I will be taking you on a virtual walking tour of Arlington–the same one outlined in 1937’s The WPA Guide to Massachusetts. Each entry will include an excerpt from the book about each site visited. Hopefully this will give us a little insight as to how things have changed in the past 73 years. Lucky number thirteen is the Jason Russell House.

“The Jason Russell House (open weekdays except Mon. 2-5, Apr.-Oct.),

7 Jason St., a wooden two-story dwelling with pitched roof and central chimney was built in 1680…

The house was occupied by descendants of the Russell family until 1890. It is now the

headquarters of the Arlington HIstorical Society.”

A typical view of the Jason Russell House on July 12, 2010.

WPA Walking Tour – Town Hall

To count down the days to the end of summer, I will be taking you on a virtual walking tour of Arlington–the same one outlined in 1937’s The WPA Guide to Massachusetts. Each entry will include an excerpt from the book about each site visited. Hopefully this will give us a little insight as to how things have changed in the past 73 years. Town Hall at number twelve.

“The Town Hall designed by R. Clipston Sturgis and built about 1914,

is a contemporary adaptation of Colonial design. Two stories in height, the ‘great hall’

is surrounded on three sides by administrative offices.”

The cupola of Arlington's Town Hall atop which sits a pineapple, a traditional symbol of welcome in New England. August 9, 2010.

WPA Walking Tour – The Indian Hunter

To count down the days to the end of summer, I will be taking you on a virtual walking tour of Arlington–the same one outlined in 1937’s The WPA Guide to Massachusetts. Each entry will include an excerpt from the book about each site visited. Hopefully this will give us a little insight as to how things have changed in the past 73 years. Though not a numbered stop on the tour in the book, the Indian Hunter is mentioned briefly on its own line.

“The Indian Hunter, by Cyrus E. Dallin (see below), stands in the park between the library and the Town Hall.”

The Menotomy Indian Hunter has long been a symbol of the town of Arlington. August 9, 2010.

WPA Walking Tour – Arlington Public Library

To count down the days to the end of summer, I will be taking you on a virtual walking tour of Arlington–the same one outlined in 1937’s The WPA Guide to Massachusetts. Each entry will include an excerpt from the book about each site visited. Hopefully this will give us a little insight as to how things have changed in the past 73 years.

“The Arlington Public Library (open weekdays 10-9), known as the Robbins Memorial Library,

erected in 1892 from the designs of Gay & Proctor, is constructed of Ohio limestone in Italian Renaissance style…

The entrance is similar in style to the main door of the Cancellaria [sic] Palace in Rome.”

Though the book cites the building material as Ohio limestone and the designers as Gay & Proctor, the Robbins Library website states that the building was designed by Cabot, Everett and Mead and was built from Indiana sandstone.

The northeast side of the Robbins Library on the night of September 5, 2010.

WPA Walking Tour – Site of Black Horse Tavern

To count down the days to the end of summer, I will be taking you on a virtual walking tour of Arlington–the same one outlined in 1937’s The WPA Guide to Massachusetts. Each entry will include an excerpt from the book about each site visited. Hopefully this will give us a little insight as to how things have changed in the past 73 years. The fourth stop is the site of the Black Horse Tavern.

“Here the Committee of Safety and Supplies of the Provincial Congress convened

on April 18, 1775. The following day a British searching party surprised Vice-President Gerry and

Colonels Leo and Orne, who escaped by making a hasty exit and concealing themselves in a near-by field.”

Now a BP filling station, a tablet marks the former site of the Black Horse Tavern. September 6, 2010.