Bunker Hill Monument

The Bunker Hill monument, perfectly framed by the trees, taken looking east-southeast on Gray Street near its intersection with Bartlett Avenue. This view, easily seen while driving at night, is reminiscent of the seal of Arlington. July 10, 2011.

A detail of the seal of Arlington can be seen here.

Oculus

The oculus, divided by longitude and latitude to represent a globe, above the motto "dedicated to good citizenship" on the former Parmenter School, currently occupied by the International School of Boston and the Arlington Children's Center. May 29, 2011.

Blue Oval – Mrs. Edward Hall House

The Mrs. Edward Hall House (1890) on Pleasant Street. May 29, 2011.

Blue Oval homes are structures designated by the Arlington Historical Commission as historically or architecturally significant. There are approximately 1,200 such structures in the Town of Arlington.

For more information, visit http://www.arlingtonhistoricalcommission.org/

See a detail of the pediment in 2010, before it was painted, and in 2011, after it was painted.

Blue Oval – Mabelle W. Hudson House

The Mabelle W. Hudson House (1900) on Pleasant Street. The latin text on the pediment reads "Cor Unum Via Una" or "One Heart, One Way." May 29, 2011.

Blue Oval homes are structures designated by the Arlington Historical Commission as historically or architecturally significant. There are approximately 1,200 such structures in the Town of Arlington.

For more information, visit http://www.arlingtonhistoricalcommission.org/

Once Around

The rotary at Mystic Valley Parkway and Medford Street was featured in the 1991 movie "Once Around" starring Holly Hunter and Richard Dreyfuss. Overhead shots of cars circling the rotary are used in the opening and closing shots of the movie as well as other important times throughout the story.

Enter

A sign on the front lawn of the Jason Russell House points towards the entrance. At left, the plaque on the flagpole honors Judge James R. Parmenter, former president of the Arlington Historical Society. August 9, 2010.

Blue Oval – Idahurst Mansion

As the most expensive building in Arlington at the time of its construction on Appleton Street in 1894, Idahurst Mansion is now split into apartments. August 31, 2010.

Blue Oval homes are structures designated by the Arlington Historical Commission as historically or architecturally significant. There are approximately 1,200 such structures in the Town of Arlington.

For more information, visit http://www.arlingtonhistoricalcommission.org/

Blue Oval – Cox-Knowles House

The Cox-Knowles House (1860) which formerly sat on Hemlock Street at the last family farm in Arlington, now sits at the end of Knowles Farm Road, a development on the former farm. August 9, 2010.

Blue Oval homes are structures designated by the Arlington Historical Commission as historically or architecturally significant. There are approximately 1,200 such structures in the Town of Arlington.

For more information, visit http://www.arlingtonhistoricalcommission.org/

Blue Oval – Butterfield-Whittemore House

The Butterfield-Whittemore House (1695/1790,) also known as the "Crooked House" as it not parallel to Massachusetts Avenue. September 29, 2010.

Blue Oval homes are structures designated by the Arlington Historical Commission as historically or architecturally significant. There are approximately 1,200 such structures in the Town of Arlington.

For more information, visit http://www.arlingtonhistoricalcommission.org/

Barber Memorial Grove

This small stone on the front lawn of the Jason Russell House marks the Barber Memorial Grove. The inscription reads: "Barber Memorial Grove. In grateful remembrance of Rev. Laurence L. Barber, president 1937-1957, and Laura B. Barber, his wife. The Arlington Historical Society." September 25, 2010.

Town Hall: Odds and Ends

A collection of fixtures and other trinkets hanging on the wall behind the stage.

Dennis Ahern writes with more information about this little display:

“The curious framework is a California Job Case of the kind used to contain
foundry type for letterpress printing. The back (bottom) of the drawer has
been removed. In a California case, the left two-thirds contain the lower
case letters and punctuation, and the right third has the capital letters
arranged alphabetically except for J and U, which are tacked on after X, Y, Z.”

“Ah! it sent to yonder graveyard many a once stout, noble form.”

General Nelson Monroe was a veteran of the Civil and Mexican-American Wars. In 1893, he published a book of “reminiscences of the days of dark secession 1861 and 1865” entitled The Grand Army Button: A Souvenir. It can be viewed in full at archives.org.

The finale of the book is a poem called “The Dead Line” at Libby Prison about the horrors of internment at the Confederate Libby Prison in Richmond, Virginia. It can be read here.

The inscription on the back of the monument can be viewed at Pictures of Arlington’s facebook page.

The grave of author, poet, and most notably, soldier, General Nelson Monroe in Mount Pleasant Cemetery. January 6, 2011.

“…Slept like a log.”

The headstone of Nina Winn at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. Her diaries from over 100 years ago are transcribed on the Arlington List each day, giving 21st Century Arlingtonians a glimpse of the past. The title of this post comes from Ms. Winn's diary of October 21, 1907: "Such a dear room in birds eye maple to sleep in & slept like a log." January 6, 2010.

“He was considered one of the finest men his town had ever produced.”

Lt. John Connors, a Navy SEAL, died on December 20, 1989 during Operation Nifty Package, a mission to disable movement of, then apprehend, Manuel Noriega. Lt. Connor’s platoon succeeded in destroying Noriega’s plane, which facilitated Noriega’s capture on January 3, 1990.

In the October 1990 issue of Reader’s Digest, Malcolm McConnell wrote about Lt. Connor’s heroism in an article titled “Measure of Man.” I hope that you may take the time to read it.

The monument to Lt. John P. Connors at the confluence of Broadway and Warren Street. January 6, 2011.

Arlington Winter

A view of Arlington in the winter from the Alewife Parking Garage on February 2, 2010.

To the top right, one can see the rubble of the Symmes site. At the top middle, the building just barely peeking above the tree line, with the three white dots on top is the Stratton School. In the center, the gabled roof of Arlington Senior Center and the white steeple of the Park Avenue Congregational Church can be seen. At the middle right, three of the four white chimneys and cupola of the Whittemore-Robbins House is visible. And to the left of that, there is the blue-domed steeple of the Highrock Church.

Click here for Arlington Autumn.