Clock Tower

The clock tower of the Unitarian Universalist Church (formerly the First Parish Congregational), which has been rebuilt at least twice--once after a tornado knocked it over in 1871 and once after a fire destroyed the whole church in 1975. September 5, 2010.

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WPA Walking Tour – Water Standpipe

To count down the days to the end of summer, I will be taking you on a virtual walking tour of Arlington–the same one outlined in 1937’s The WPA Guide to Massachusetts. Each entry will include an excerpt from the book about each site visited. Hopefully this will give us a little insight as to how things have changed in the past 73 years. This post brings us not only to the last stop on the tour, but the last day of summer 2010.

“The Water Standpipe (open to visitors each second Sun.) rises 50 feet above the loftiest point on Arlington Heights, emphasizing

the great difference between the lowest and highest altitude of this town. From a balcony near the top,

Boston and the harbor are visible to the east; to the west Mt. Monadnock and Mt. Wachusett are dim blue shapes on the horizon.”

The Park Avenue water tower on July 22, 2010.

WPA Walking Tour – Home of Cyrus E. Dallin

To count down the days to the end of summer, I will be taking you on a virtual walking tour of Arlington–the same one outlined in 1937’s The WPA Guide to Massachusetts. Each entry will include an excerpt from the book about each site visited. Hopefully this will give us a little insight as to how things have changed in the past 73 years. Our second to last stop is the Home of Cyrus E. Dallin.

“The Home of Cyrus E. Dallin (private), 69 Oakland Ave., also serves as the eminent sculptor’s studio.

Mr. Dallin (1861-       ), a native of Utah, is well known for his understanding portrayals of the American Indian.

Among his most noted works are ‘Appeal to the Great Spirit,’ which stands before the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston,

and ‘Medicine Man,’ in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia.”

At the time of the entry, Dallin still lived in the house and today it remains a private residence. August 31, 2010.

WPA Walking Tour – St. Anne’s Chapel

To count down the days to the end of summer, I will be taking you on a virtual walking tour of Arlington–the same one outlined in 1937’s The WPA Guide to Massachusetts. Each entry will include an excerpt from the book about each site visited. Hopefully this will give us a little insight as to how things have changed in the past 73 years. Number sixteen isn’t easy to spot, as it is nestled in pine trees on Claremont Avenue.

“St. Anne’s Chapel (open), between Hillside and Claremont Aves.,

was designed by Cram and Ferguson and completed in 1916. It is built in Romanesque style,

the interior and exterior being of local field-stone.

It is furnished with ancient ecclesiastical furniture, most of which came from Spain and Italy.”

St. Anne's Chapel on August 31, 2010.

WPA Walking Tour – Benjamin Locke House

To count down the days to the end of summer, I will be taking you on a virtual walking tour of Arlington–the same one outlined in 1937’s The WPA Guide to Massachusetts. Each entry will include an excerpt from the book about each site visited. Hopefully this will give us a little insight as to how things have changed in the past 73 years. A ways up Massachusetts Avenue brings us to site number fifteen.

“The Benjamin Locke House (private), 21 Appleton St., was built (1726) by a captain of the militia.

When the British passed by, about two o’clock on the morning of April 19, Captain Locke was awakened

and rushed out to arouse his neighbors. In a short time he was able to muster 26 men.

By afternoon the band grew to 52, which, with companies from surrounding towns,

joined in harassing the rear of Percy’s retreating column.”

The Benjamin Locke House on August 31, 2010.

WPA Walking Tour – Site of the Deacon Joseph Adams House

To count down the days to the end of summer, I will be taking you on a virtual walking tour of Arlington–the same one outlined in 1937’s The WPA Guide to Massachusetts. Each entry will include an excerpt from the book about each site visited. Hopefully this will give us a little insight as to how things have changed in the past 73 years. Though I wasn’t able to locate the tablet mentioned in the entry, stop number fourteen is the site of the Deacon Joseph Adams House.

“A tablet at 840 Massachusetts Ave. identifies the Site of the Deacon Joseph Adams House, from which

British soldiers stole the communion service of the First Parish during their retreat from Lexington and Concord.”

This apartment building (and a bus stop) now occupies 840 Massachusetts Avenue. September 5, 2010.

WPA Walking Tour – Jason Russell House

To count down the days to the end of summer, I will be taking you on a virtual walking tour of Arlington–the same one outlined in 1937’s The WPA Guide to Massachusetts. Each entry will include an excerpt from the book about each site visited. Hopefully this will give us a little insight as to how things have changed in the past 73 years. Lucky number thirteen is the Jason Russell House.

“The Jason Russell House (open weekdays except Mon. 2-5, Apr.-Oct.),

7 Jason St., a wooden two-story dwelling with pitched roof and central chimney was built in 1680…

The house was occupied by descendants of the Russell family until 1890. It is now the

headquarters of the Arlington HIstorical Society.”

A typical view of the Jason Russell House on July 12, 2010.